Wednesday, January 28, 2009

Snow, snow and more freaking snow....

I am hearing the rumblings of my friends, coworkers and neighbors grumping about the snow. It just seems to keep coming and coming. I actually, kind of enjoy it. Once, of course, we are home safe and sound.
The sheep seem oblivious to it. I think it cleanses the fleeces that are not covered by "sheep coats". It also provides clean ground for them to hang out, and lie down on. Not to mention that I get to feed them on the ground. Which, when the ground is not fresh and new, is not a good practice because we run the risk of spreading parasites. The snow takes care of that. Feeding sheep on the ground, as opposed to a feeder, mimics the motions that they would have on pasture. This helps keep hay and hay chaff out of the fleeces. So, a couple of inches of snow, every few days keeps things in order. No poopy/muddy messy looking barnyard . I prefer snow over when things begin to thaw. No matter how hard you try, the barnyard looks like a mud pit and you run the risk of feet problems(with the sheep and goats) and fleeces start to look a little grungy. This is when you pray that the shearer is coming as soon as possible! Get those fleeces off before the mud season. The really good news is, that after a snow storm you can reach right down under the fleece and the body of the sheep is warm and dry. An ode to the magic properties of wool! Not to mention, if you are a knitter, there is no better time to curl up with your needles and yarn.... you can't do anything else when it is snowing! A storm is like a mandatory "time out".
So, the moral of the story is.. if the snow is getting you down... think about the sheep... snow is not "all baaahd".
Have a safe journey!
Many blessings!
Sheila

1 comment:

Eulalia (Lali) said...

I was just thinking this afternoon how clean everything looks in the landscape. I cannot imagine having animals whose coats must be kept clean so you can make clothing for people out of them! I can't keep myself clean in mud season, let alone a sheep.